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Janaway
Janaway under sail
Janaway under sail

CountryAustralia
Sail NumberMH4
ClubMiddle Harbour Yacht Club
Year Build1938 (age 83)
Owner (s)J.P. Ward
Les Soars
Syd and Jim Perry
Designer (s)Wally Ward
Builder(s)Jim Perry
Sid Perry

Janaway

From MHYC: The First 60Years

Article by: John Ward

Published: 1999

Janaway was built afloat by Sid and Jim Perry in their houseboat at The Spit, the living room partitions being removed to make room so that the Perrys could live down below in the hull while building proceeded.

Constructed from spotted-gum keel and timbers, the New Zealand kauri planking, excess from a recently completed lifeboat contract, was delivered by water from Morrison and Sinclair where it was excess from a lifeboat just completed. All fastenings were roved, and an Austin 7 marine engine fitted. The hull was completely constructed by hand tools, the only electricity being available was a generator used for lighting.

Headroom was restricted in the houseboat, and Janaway was launched in October 1938 without keel or ballast, and with the keel boltholes plugged. The keel and lead were fitted at Griffin's shed and a second launching followed.

The design by Wally Ward was possibly the first truly Australian design to use the 'metacentric balance theory', which produced a hull free from weather helm when heeled. Over succeeding years, various modifications were made, one of which repositioned the rudder with the propeller shaft actually running through the centre of the rudder stock. The sail area was increased to improve light weather performance, and she was fitted with solid rod stainless rigging.

Janaway raced successfully, taking part in the first three Sweepstake races organised by 'Togo' Middows and George Griffin under the banner of 'Middle Harbour Cruising Yachts Association (later MHYC). So successful was she that Wally Ward was encouraged to design modified versions: first Jasnar, then Camira followed by the 'Carmens' and Camille. The Carmens have spread all over Australia since Jim Mason's sucess in winning the Hobart Race in Cadence under the Middle Harbour Yacht Club burgee.

Janaway remained in the Ward family for about 35 years. Currently she has been expertly refurbished to almost as good a new condition by Les Sours, and is now kept in McCarr's Creek.

Note: The Carmens have spread all around Australia since Jim Mason's success in winning the Hobart race with Cadence, also from Middle Harbour Yacht Club. The first 2 Carmens, Cadence and Cavelier were built side-by side by Ron Swanson at Dee Why. Camile was also built by Ron Swanson who sailed he most successfully, taking her to the Admiral's Cup and later competing in the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race.

Pictures

 From MHYC Archives

Janaway under sail
Janaway under sail
Janaway under sail
Janaway under sail
A History of Janaway
A History of Janaway
Janaway and Shalimar at The Spit
Janaway and Shalimar at The Spit
Building of Janaway
Building of Janaway
Start of MHYC Race in early 50
Start of MHYC Race in early 50's

Boat Sheds in Fisher Bay

Some Boatshed scenes in Fisher Bay - Believe this is the Perry Boathouse

About the Boathouses in Fisher Bay

Fisher Bay Houseboat

During the Depression there were up to 32 legal residential houseboats moored in Middle Harbour. Today only four remain; this one - which started life as a steel-hulled barge - and three others in Pearl Bay, on the other side of Spit Bridge.

In the late 1940s, this houseboat was briefly the childhood home of local resident Dennis Francis who recalls;

I was seven then, and Mum cooked on a Primus [gas stove] and we generated our own electricity.

Sometimes we walked around the bush track to catch the tram to school but ticks were a worry so mostly we rowed across to Mrs Ferguson's boatshed and then left our dinghy there till after school. I remember carrying big blocks of ice in our dinghy for our ice chest.

We regularly beached the houseboat and repainted the hull. My sister and I would often watch hundreds of dolphins playing from our bedroom window. We cooked and ate [mussels] from off the pylons of the old Spit Bridge.

Mosman Memories of Your Street: Dennis Francis' Memories of Mosman

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