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Eos
Eos MH71
Eos MH71

CountryAustralia
Boat TypeBrittany Class
Sail NumberMH71
ClubMiddle Harbour Yacht Club
RigMasthead Sloop
LOA10.21m, 33.5f
LWL7.74m, 25.4f
Beam2.56m, 8.4f
Draught1.64m, 5.4f
Displacement6800 lbs
Year Build1956 (age 62)
Webwww.rolexsydneyhobart.com/the-yachts/1960/eos/
Owner (s)Brian Wilson
Tom Flower
Designer (s)Jack Laurent Giles
Builder(s)David Linton
Tom Flower

Eos

Eos, owned by Tom Flower, was the first Brittany Class sloop in Australia.

Brian Wilson owned her in 1994 and sailed her in the 50th Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race.

Pictures and Articles

The "Other man's boat: Eos" written by Jack Sargent appeared in the Seacraft Magazine November 1956

CYCA's Great Veterans Race eligibility extended   www.woodenboat.com.au/news/story.asp?story=12347

Eos owned by Tom Flower
Eos owned by Tom Flower
Eos owned by Tom Flower
Eos owned by Tom Flower
The other man
The other man's boat: Eos by Jack Sargent

Launching of Eos

The launching of Tom Flower's Brittany Class sloop Eos took place on Saturday, 26 May 1956. He had chosen a site which the haulage contractor had declared an easy job. By normal standards it may have been easy, but the amount of clearance the trailer driver had to weave his long vehicle back across the yard could have been best measured with a feeler gauge.

The crane, already in position, had a trial run for positioning the jib over the hole that had been made in the roof of the shed in which Eos, the first of her class built in Australia, lay resplendent.

Two huge wire slings were slung under, and passed to the hook on the crane, chafing blocks of softwood having been fastened to the hull previously, to take the load. The slings were parcelled with hessian to protect the paintwork.

With a line to the bow and another to the stern to prevent spin when the crane lifted her, Eos was ready to take the air. As she was raised, four chocks were placed around the hull to support her and then two large Oregon flitches placed athwartships across the deck. Chains were fastened to the ends of the flitches and pulled down to the deck of the loader with chain and pulleys.

She was released and left supported by four chocks and four chains - light rigging it seemed for a 7.5-ton lady who was to still face a couple of miles of roadwork, possibly more severe than she would ever face afloat.

The route to the water, having been previously used by the haulier, was known to be free of traps such as low power lines, low bridges, and so on, although a tight hairpin bend was to test the driver's skill.

With all care and caution, the convoy (loader, yacht, crane, several carloads of well-wishers, small boys on bicycles, and barking dogs) moved off towards Middle Harbour, Where the crane again took her and gently placed her on a marine slipway.

And the damage? A spot of anti-fouling about the size of a postage stamp rubbed off. Tom declared that if he had known the way she was to have been handled, he would not have lost a wink of sleep the night before, and he could then have arrived in time to see her placed on the slipway.

Transporting Eos to launch circa 1956
Transporting Eos to launch circa 1956
Eos on the Slips
Eos on the Slips

Articles about the Launching of Eos

Seacraft Magazine November 1956

Transporting a Yacht by Max Barnett

Transporting a Yacht by Max Barnett
Transporting a Yacht by Max Barnett
Transporting a Yacht by Max Barnett
Transporting a Yacht by Max Barnett
Transporting a Yacht by Max Barnett
Transporting a Yacht by Max Barnett

Eos in the 1956 Hobart

Eos in Training before the 1956 Sydney to Hobart Yacht Races
Eos in Training before the 1956 Sydney to Hobart Yacht Races

1994 Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race - 50th

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